Sunday Reflections

A Sunday Reflection:

Sunday, October 12, 2014

Having leprosy isn’t easy.
I haven’t had this life as long as my friends - my “misery loves company” friends, nine of them.  One of them is an oddball - he’s actually a Samaritan.  Never spoke to a Samaritan in my life before this happened.

A Sunday Reflection:

Sunday, May 25, 2014

Paul is in Athens, at the Areopagus, also known as Mars’ Hill.  He saw a shrine to an “unknown god”.  And he begins to speak to the people, to tell them that he can give them answers, that the “unknown god” can become the “known God” - that the people can come to know God, and come to know Jesus’ way in the world.

He has something to tell the people, starting with where they are at, and what he has to tell them is something they want to know - just they had not known about it before.

A Sunday Reflection:

Sunday, May 18, 2014

You are Saul.  That is one of your names - it is your Jewish name, if you wish.  You have another name too, but it will be used more later in life.

As a child, you grow up as the son of a Pharisee - you grow up in the strict orthodox Pharasaic tradition.  You know the rules and the regulations, and you expect to follow them.   And others should follow them too.

Truly, as you say later, a Pharisee, son of a Pharisee.

A Sunday Reflection:

Sunday, May 11, 2014

The LORD is my shepherd,

God is the for us to follow.  
Not some other set of values.
We are not to follow the shepherd of the materialistic society around us.
We are not to be shepherded by the innundation of advertizing that pushes us this way and that.
We are not to be misled by the words of those who would have us follow their values that are not in harmony with God’s ways.

For
the Lord is my shepherd.

A Sunday Reflection:

Sunday, April 27, 2014

Last Sunday we started hearing the Easter account from the Gospel of John.  The accounts vary a little bit in detail from Gospel to Gospel, but this year, given the choice between Matthew and John, I happened to choose John.  

A Sunday Reflection:

Sunday, March 30, 2014

Lots of questions - literally - in this week’s text.

The disciples ask a question:

Jesus and the 12 disciples come to the synagogue, and they see a man who was blind from birth.
They ask:
    "Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?"

Ahh, yes, whenever things go wrong, we’re looking for someone to blame.  
We’re disappointed when inquiries are set up to find out what went wrong.
We’d rather hear WHO did something wrong.

A Sunday Reflection:

Sunday, March 9, 2014

Today we heard part of the story from Genesis about Adam and Eve.  First off, let’s be clear: I am not approaching this text as history, but as theology.  It was not meant to tell us a chronological series of events, but it was written to tell us about God.  And, in the reading today, it was written to tell us about: us.  

A Sunday Reflection:

Sunday, February 23, 2014

I’ve said it before, but let me repeat: Life in Galilee was pretty harsh in Jesus’ day.  

Just to begin:  The Roman soldiers had a lot of power.  Frequently they would randomly point to someone - maybe you.  “Hey, you,” they would bark, “It’s your turn to give a hand.  Here’s my pack.... you’re going to carry it.  One mile.  Now.”  And that was would you would do.  Because that was the law. And then they would tell someone else to carry it, and on it went.

A Sunday Reflection:

Sunday, February 16, 2014

So when you are offering your gift at the altar, if you remember that your brother or sister has something against you, leave your gift there before the altar and go; first be reconciled to your brother or sister, and then come and offer your gift.

Life in the Corinthian congregation certainly had its good points.
And its bad points.

I’ve already talked a bit about it in past weeks, but want to look a little deeper.  

A Sunday Reflection:

Sunday, February 9, 2014

If I were to do a session with our scripture readers on how to read scripture, today’s reading from Isaiah is one that I would love to choose as an exercise.  Normally, when people read scripture, they try to read clearly, not too fast....  And so the Isaiah reading would be thus:

Shout out, do not hold back! Lift up your voice like a trumpet!
Announce to my people their rebellion, to the house of Jacob their sins.  

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